Book Review: All The Light We Cannot See

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Author: Anthony Doerr

Published: January 15th 2015 by Fourth Estate (First published May 6th 2014)

Blurb:

Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History where he works as the master of the locks (there are thousands of locks in the museum). When she is six, she goes blind, and her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, every house, every manhole, so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint-Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie-Laure’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea wall.

In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up with his younger sister, Jutta, both enchanted by a crude radio Werner finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far-flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint-Malo, where his path converges with Marie-Laure. Continue reading “Book Review: All The Light We Cannot See”

Book Review: A School For Unusual Girls

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Author: Kathleen Baldwin

Published: May 19th 2015 by Tor Teen

Blurb:

It’s 1814. Napoleon is exiled on Elba. Europe is in shambles. Britain is at war on four fronts. And Stranje House, a School for Unusual Girls, has become one of Regency England’s dark little secrets. The daughters of the beau monde who don’t fit high society’s constrictive mold are banished to Stranje House to be reformed into marriageable young ladies. Or so their parents think. In truth, Headmistress Emma Stranje, the original unusual girl, has plans for the young ladies—plans that entangle them in the dangerous world of spies, diplomacy, and war.

After accidentally setting her father’s stables on fire while performing a scientific experiment, Miss Georgiana Fitzwilliam is sent to Stranje House. But Georgie has no intention of being turned into a simpering, pudding-headed, marriageable miss. She plans to escape as soon as possible—until she meets Lord Sebastian Wyatt. Thrust together in a desperate mission to invent a new invisible ink for the English war effort, Georgie and Sebastian must find a way to work together without losing their heads—or their hearts… Continue reading “Book Review: A School For Unusual Girls”

Book Review: Paths of Glory

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Author: Jeffrey Archer

Published: March 3rd 2009 by St. Martin’s Press (First published January 1st 2009)

Blurb (taken from Goodreads):

Some people have dreams that are so magnificent that if they were to achieve them, their place in history would be guaranteed. Francis Drake, Robert Scott, Charles Lindbergh, Amy Johnson, Edmund Hilary, Neil Armstrong, and Lewis and Clark are among such individuals.

But what if one man had such a dream, and once he’d fulfilled it, there was no proof that he had achieved his ambition?

Jeffrey Archer’s book, Paths of Glory, is the story of such a man—George Mallory. Mallory once told an American reporter that he wanted to climb Mt. Everest, “because it’s there.” On his third attempt in 1924, at age thirty-seven, he was last seen six hundred feet from the top. His body was found in 1999, and it still remains a mystery whether he ever reached the summit.

But only after you’ve turned the last page of this extraordinary novel, inspired by a true story, will you be able to decide if George Mallory’s name should be added to the list of legends, in which case another name would have to be removed. Paths of Glory is truly a triumph. Continue reading “Book Review: Paths of Glory”

Book Review: Edith From Wessex: Wife of Otto the Great- A Medieval Queen

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Author: Regine Sondermann

Published: April 7th 2016

Blurb:

“You’d like to love me, but you don’t really know me.”

With these words, Queen Edith begins to speak to us, as if she were still able to address us, though she lived over a thousand years ago. Magdeburg author Regine Sondermann draws the reader close to this woman from the early Middle Ages, about whom little was known until now. She was young and came from England. She died at the age of 36, and she was laid to rest in the Magdeburg Cathedral. The author sifted through documents and history books to discover small shards of Edith’s short life, like a ceramic bowl destroyed long ago. She has pieced them together in this story of a woman and her family, which takes the reader to an unfamiliar land that seems so close but is infinitely far away. Continue reading “Book Review: Edith From Wessex: Wife of Otto the Great- A Medieval Queen”

Book Recommendation: I Wish I Knew That: U.S. Presidents

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Edited by: Patricia A. Halbert

Published: February 2nd 2012 by Readers Digest (First published February 1st 2012)

I’ve been interested lately in broadening my horizons and reading non-fiction book, so I picked this small, handy book off my TBR pile of books and read a few pages everyday while I was at work. It contains a short introduction of all the past US presidents and highlights their contribution to the United States and what went on in the world around them during their time in office. Continue reading “Book Recommendation: I Wish I Knew That: U.S. Presidents”